Contents

/* custom css */. td_uid_2_5f379d581e222_rand. td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .

How to Find a Shooting Range

How to Find a Shooting Range/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d581e222_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d581e222_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Looking for a place to go shoot? The NSSF has an online and mobile resource to help you track down a local shooting range. The NSSF’s Where to Shoot resource allows shooters to find nearby ranges by state or zip code. Photo by Drew Warden As many shooters know, an important aspect of gun ownership is regularly getting out and spending time shooting. The most effective method of growing shooting sports is to get new and young shooters involved. The best—and perhaps the only—way of accomplishing this is to get them out at the range. A range session is an enjoyable and necessary experience for any shooter regardless of skill level. Range trips help educate and familiarize new shooters with firearm safety and shooting basics, and they serve as valuable training time for more seasoned shooters. Unfortunately, while trips to the shooting range are the primary building blocks for any shooter’s development, finding and accessing ranges isn’t always easy. Shooters living in rural areas may have the benefit of shooting on their own private land or that of a friend. Many new shooters, especially those in urban areas, simply don’t have that luxury. The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), the trade association for the firearms industry, has helped shooters solve this problem by creating a comprehensive, searchable directory ( WhereToShoot.org ) that lists places to shoot. Available as an online guide or downloadable as an app for Apple and Android smartphones, the directory is expansive and offers shooters many great resources. Related GunDigest Articles Gun Range: Where to Shoot Shooting Accessories: 10 Cool New Things for the Bench and Range Video: Primer on Reading the Wind Down Range Where to Shoot Designed to be quick and simple to use, the NSSF’s “Where to Shoot” directory provides a few different options for finding the right place to shoot. The user can view listings by state or search the directory by inputting a zip code and a distance parameter ranging from 5 miles up to 120 miles. These are the only two ways to find shooting areas on the mobile app; however, the online directory can filter results even further based on several other factors. One of these filtering options is “shooting activities,” which allows the user to select ranges based on the type of activities they offer. These include shotgun events such as trap and skeet, centerfire or rimfire rifle shooting, and handgun shooting, among others. Whether the ranges have dedicated archery or airgun areas can similarly be used to limit results. Choices can also be filtered by what kind of competitions and organized events the range hosts, or even by what type of services are available (retail store, food service, camper/RV sites, etc.). Likewise, those looking for hunting opportunities can find them by choosing among several different types of game animals they’d like to pursue. This level of detail allows shooters to find the location that fits their exact needs and desires, and which will hopefully translate into continued or even expanded participation in the shooting sports. One-Stop Shop Users can also locate ranges based on what shooting activities they offer. Photo by Drew Warden A guide to finding ranges is an excellent tool for shooters, but the NSSF doesn’t stop there. In addition to helping users locate shooting areas, the online directory offers an assortment of useful tips and tools, especially for novice shooters. Under a separate tab on the Where to Shoot homepage titled “Resources,” the NSSF provides links to several educational guides and a host of informative sources. There are links to the NSSF’s YouTube channel, where users can find instructional videos on shooting tips and tactics, and to the NSSF blog, where shooters can view the latest industry news and trends.

When the Patent Runs Dry: Trijcons ACOG Up for Grabs

When the Patent Runs Dry: Trijcons ACOG Up for Grabs

2008… that’s the year the ACOG’s patent protections have lapsed. So why hasn’t someone given us true competitor to the throne? Why has the market failed to respond with an answer to the ACOG? Trijicon has given the shooting community, and our country, an impressive catalog of optical tools. No doubt, Trijicon makes some very unique products that you cannot find anywhere else. The ACOG was patented in 1989 and it slowly became the prized AR15 optic among the shooting community, law enforcement, and military. Having owned one myself, it is indeed a tough, lightweight, optical powerhouse. I spent years saving for one… and eventually I capitulated by putting it on the credit card as life kept getting in the way. Why are these things so damn expensive? In 2005 the Marine Corps acquired “104,000 scopes at $610 each” in 2005 as part of their rifle combat optic program. That’s a huge deal and shows the power of bulk pricing, and the value of the contract is obviously worth it to Trijicon who can still make a profit while producing the optics for $610 dollars a piece. That same optic costs us $1358 with the latest price coming off Amazon.com. Keep in mind that the contract for the Marines ACOG includes a Ta51 mount, RCO killflash, carry pouch, and bikini covers. That’s all included with the military’s order too. Searching around on the many gun forums can lead some insight into what dealers pay as well. Some dealers mention markup varies and that one pays around $700 for his ACOGs. Obviously pricing tiers play into the factor of the ACOG’s cost to the dealer. Huge orders mean better pricing. One thing we all pay is Trijicon’s MAP price. Dealers cannot sell below a price point that Trijicon deems acceptable. With the price of bulk military orders in the $600 dollar range, it makes me wonder what the profit margins are on the ACOG. After all, the design has been around over 20 years. The forged housings and the R&D related to that process must be long paid for. The optical assembly has rolled off the product line for 20 years as well. Trijicon is making good money. So why hasn’t someone made a product to challenge the market supremacy of the 4x ACOG? The Competitors: Jun 30, 2009 PG25 Lapsed in a contracting state announced via postgrant inform. from nat. office to epo Ref country code: GB Free format text: LAPSE BECAUSE OF EXPIRATION OF PROTECTION Effective date: 20081027 One company to take immediate advantage of the patent lapse of the ACOG was Browe . Debuting sometime in 2009, which equates roughly to the year after the patent lapse on Glyn Bindon’s Optical Gun Sight… Browe set to work developing a version with newer technology and more whiz-bang features: a titanium housing, electronic, automatically adjusting brightness, an auto wakeup, a two-way I/O and power port, and a auto wake up feature. The Browe Combat Optic: Notice the two piece housing, the turret placement, and overall form factor. This is among the first example of a post patent ACOG introduced to the market. Yes, it is a “ACOG”. It’s important to note that the Browe shares the same form factor as the ACOG because it’s based on Glyn Bindon’s design and is run by a former Trijicon employee. This is a direct competitor to the ACOG as it *IS* an ACOG, just not in name. It also shares the short eye relief of the Trijicon 4x product. One problem with the BROW system was how strong it came out in the price department. With the costs of starting a new company, and the cost of establishing its own product line, plus the research and development, the cost was above Trijicon’s lineup of comparable models… many people saw the BROWE as a more expensive ACOG. Civilian sales are important… and Browe quickly moved to introduce a Sport Optic model, but I would have preferred a BROWE push back directly against Trijicon’s TA02 series with a simple brightness dial instead of all the electronic wizardry. Another route would have been to attack the TA01 and TA01 NSN series with the ACOG form factor and the glowing reticle instead of the 34mm monocle thing that Browe instead developed: The Browe Sport Optic with glow in the dark reticle: This should have looked like the BCO above and should be priced to compete with the TA01. But it doesn’t and it doesn’t So Browe has given us the ACOG re-imagined as a whiz-bang, feature filled, high-tech ACOG. They just don’t have the decades of recognition that Trijicon has and they need to find a balance between the high-end titanium optics, the middle “BTO” line which directly competes with Trijicon in price, and the low-end sport optic that just doesn’t seem to be taking any ground from Trijicon’s cheapest line of ACOGs. There are two other similar 4x optics on the horizon which may incorporate some design elements of the ACOG into their production, but little is known about them as of yet. Lucid’s new P7 and Meprolight’s vaporware 4x combat optic from Shot Show 2013… neither of which have hit the market as of yet. The Lucid P7 4x has some similar design elements to the ACOG but I cannot say for sure if its design lineage is a result of Glyn Bindon’s patent. So Browe is the most obvious example I can think of as an example of utilizing the patents of Glyn Bindon. The company may as well be the direct offspring of Trijicon . The others listed bear a passing resemblance to the ACOG, but I bet it’s not just a passing on the inside. There are many examples of *other* fixed combat style optics such as the Leupold Hamr, the ELCAN M145 and Specter series, and several others such as IOR Valdada… but these don’t necessarily share in the design of the ACOG and companies like ELCAN have been competing with Trijicon for military contracts for decades. Many of the brands mentioned above have neither the price nor familiarity to really steal much of the market from Trijicon. The SpecterDR has a great military pedigree, but let’s face it… this is a optic out of reach for most of us . So what other ACOG’s alternatives are available to the average man? The Prismatic Invasion from Overseas: Remember that NCSTAR lawsuit? NC Star claimed they were introducing a 1:1 clone of the Trijicon ACOG line and they were quickly sued into saying “sorry!”. This was in 2005. I have no idea why NCSTAR would think its a good idea to do something like this without researching patent law. Patent number US 4806007 A hadn’t expired yet. What it reveals to us is that China has copied the ACOG for a long time: Marcool ACOG clone 4x with working fiber optic assembly. Costs $79 dollars. A trip over to ALIBABA.com can reveal a girth of ACOG clones and multiple other OEM prismatic designs used by Burris, Primary Arms, and Vortex. Many of the ACOG style clones are blatant rip-offs… oops I mean legitimate copies of the ACOG. They are legally legit now because the patent ran out and we should accept the forces of the semi-free market. Because Capitalism. Many of these clones are both cheaply made and likely to be horrendous quality, especially at 79 dollars . The scary part for Trijicon is if an individual takes a trip to China to import these after strict QC measures are put into place… That would spell trouble for Trijicon. One company (redacted per company request) has really pushed into the red dot arena by introducing red dots from overseas with strict quality control measures and his products have proven to be wildly popular, and they are no doubt stealing sales from established companies like Aimpoint. These red dots have gotten a reputation for durability at a low price, and that’s because of the additional QC the company puts into the product. I could easily see this scenario playing out for 4x optics. Every cheap clone sold is potential money taken away from Trijicon. As a civilian market, we should be over the clone issue, especially for a manufacturer willing to up the quality. Civilians need quality optics at all levels, especially for those among us who have a desire to be prepared yet have to work around a low budget. Atibal is yet another company working away at their take on the ACOG. Their 4x prismatic is a direct ACOG clone without fiber optics, and Glyn Bindon would recognize it immediately. I have handled this one side by side with a ACOG and yup… it shares many design elements including the prism assembly. It’s now being assembled in the USA for a better handle on QC. Here is the thing: the ACOG is a near BOMBPROOF design, so if it is among the best, and most robust optics ever designed, then clone away! The market will separate the wheat from the chaff. Wrapping Up: It’s only a matter of time before Trijicon will be releasing a SPORT model. Too many competitors are coming to the market. In the last few years at shot Trijicon has introduced new toy after new toy to build up their product line and I believe that was in response to the patent lapsing on the ACOG. Everything they produce is tough, and military grade… but it seems that every product they have introduced has been judged against their flagship product. Trijicon will eventually need to follow a similar path to AIMPOINT and add a better priced model such as the PRO. I see a nicely priced TA01 in the future… and perhaps it will have a glow in the dark reticle and be somewhat affordable. I would be more than happy to slap another GENUINE Trijicon “sport optic” on my rifle… Why? Because one thing the other companies can’t replicate is that pedigree. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Best Mossberg 500 Stocks [Hands-On Tested]

Best Mossberg 500 Stocks [Hands-On Tested]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The Mossberg 500 platform is one of the legendary American shotguns, it’s well made, dependable, and proven . There are a lot of features I could name that make the case for the Mossberg 500, but today we are going to talk about one of the most important. Maverick 88 with Folded FAB Defense Stock, Also Fits Mossberg 500/590 Adaptability, modularity, and the aftermarket of accessories.  This is important because the ability to adopt a firearm to roles and situations is a critical one.  It allows you to adapt the weapon to your needs, and even allows it to serve multiple purposes. There are two parts that really change the weapon’s capabilities, the barrel and the stock . Shotgun Diagram, Just So We Know the Difference Between the Stock and Barrel Everything else is adaptable, but these two parts make the biggest difference. Lucky for you, there are tons and tons of options for stocks.  Like dozens of them. Some of them are complete and uncomfortable crap.  And some of them are amazing. Now, how you do sort between the crap and the good stuff? Well, that’s why you came here. I am a shotgunner, and I have more shotguns in my collection than any other category combined.  So, I’ve gone forward and found what I think are the best stocks on the market for the Mossberg 500. Also as a quick note, to answer any questions preemptively, these stocks are all compatible with the Mossberg 500, the 590, the 590A1 and the Maverick 88 series of shotguns. Mossberg 500 300 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 300 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Best Mossberg 500 Stocks 1. Shockwave Raptor Grip See, right off the bat, I’m playing fast and loose with the definition of a stock.  The Shockwave Raptor grip isn’t a stock, but it attaches to the rear of your Mossberg 500.  I included it because it’s likely one of the best pistol grips only options for a shotgunner on a budget. Best Pistol Shotgun Grip "Shockwave Raptor Grip" 26 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 26 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing It’s only 30 bucks, and superior to almost every pistol grip only option on the market. So, when you include the price it’s hard to beat.  The Raptor grip is a pistol grip that is more horizontal than vertical and resembles the classic grips that used to occupy the Witness Protection 12 gauges used by the U.S. Marshals. Courtesy of Tactical Life A normal pistol grip on a 12 gauge shotgun it is a very uncomfortable, and very harsh grip to have.  The recoil from the powerful gun is sent straight back into your wrist and it’s not comfortable, to say the least.  The Shockwave Raptor grip makes the force move upwards rather than rearward. Mossberg Shockwave The horizontal nature wants to push the recoil of the shotgun upwards, but the forward weight of the shotgun fights this natural rise. The Shockwave is superbly comfortable, even with serious buckshot loads. Sure, it’s not as stable as a stock, but it’s a great pistol grip option when you’re on a budget. Mossberg agrees and when designing their Shockwave, they included the grip and named the weapon after it. We did a write up on the Shockwave here . I love the grip personally, and for thirty bucks it’s a bargain.  Plus, it looks cool, and looking cool is half the battle. 2. Magpul SGA Best Overall Upgrade Magpul SGA Ambidextrous Butt Stock 105 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 105 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing There is a classic debate between traditional shotgun stocks and pistol grip shotgun stocks. On the traditional side, shooters claim a traditional stock points better and make instinctive shooting easier.  Pistol grip shotgunners cite increased one-handed control, and often the ability to shorten the length of pull. Magpul SGA and Magpul forend The Magpul SGA stock is likely the best compromise between both a traditional stock and pistol grip stock.  The SGA stock is best described as a hybrid that retains the best of both worlds. It points naturally and provides excellent one-handed control. The Mossberg 500 pump action shotgun requires two hands, but in some situations, you may be forced to utilize one hand to open a door, shield a child, or climb a tree stand. The more vertical pistol grip of the SGA stock makes it comfortable and possible to do this without worrying about wrist discomfort or your barrel dipping. Because the vertical grip isn’t a straight 90 degrees you maintain your ability to naturally point and maneuver the shotgun.  It also has an adjustable length of pull from 12.5 inches to 14.5 inches via a system of spacers. This isn’t an immediate adjustability, but it’s a consistent one. The stock allows you to easily reach and activate the Mossberg’s tang safety.  You also get sling loops and the ability to add cheek risers to make using optics easier.  The Magpul stock is respected so much that Mossberg even offers a factory Magpul model with the SGA Stock and pump. 3. Blackhawk Knoxx Breachersgrip Gen 3 I said at the top of this article that the Shockwave was the best pistol grip for a budget. But do you want to know what the best pistol grip option is, period?  The "Blackhawk Knoxx Breachersgrip" Gen 3. Knoxx Breachersgrip Gen III 70 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 70 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing This piece of gear is brand new, and is a bit hard to find right now because it’s in high demand. The Knoxx Grip is something else entirely.  From the name, you can probably tell what the intended purpose is, and at first look, you are probably wondering why the butt end is just so long? That big butt is what makes the Knoxx Breachersgrip so unique, it has a built-in internal buffer that helps fight the vicious recoil of a 12 gauge shotgun with just a pistol grip. This buffer adds a little length, but the length is well worth the amount of recoil reduction you get. Knoxx Grip Installed I’ve been testing and evaluating one of these bad boys for a few weeks now and love it. This grip makes kittens out of even the fierce and powerful Winchester PDX slugs.  The recoil buffer does its job extremely well. Now outside of the buffer tube and recoil reduction capabilities the Knoxx is a well-made and thought out option.  The grip is nice and thick, checkered and feels good in the hand. The rear of the grip, on the outside of the buffer tube, is a sling attachment point with an included QD sling mount. Knoxx Grip Firing This grip makes controlling a short and light AOW, a full-on shotgun, or a short-barreled shotgun not only possible but comfortable. The recoil reduction allows you to fire rapidly, with better accuracy and control. Normally a PGO shotgun is a great way to develop a flinch, but with the Knoxx Breachersgrip, you won’t have that issue. If you want the recoil reducing capability with the stability of a stock there is an almost identical version of this grip fitted with a collapsing stock. I don’t have any personal experience with this stock, but it uses the same buffer so recoil reduction will be top notch. 4. Blackhawk CompStock Most Recoil Reducing Blackhawk! Compstock Buttstock 100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing My first experience with any recoil reducing stock was the Blackhawk Compstock, at the time I didn’t believe these things work.  However, I had a torn rotator cuff, and someone offered it as a solution. Imagine my surprise when I could shoot a few rounds of skeet without discomfort. BLACKHAWK Compstock The Blackhawk Compstock is a traditional stock that looks plain, and unassuming.  Its black polymer without any kind of tactical do-dad or gadget. It’s thicker near the rear, but all good things are. This is certainly a case of don’t judge a book by its cover. Inside the stock is a recoil reducing buffer system.  This system allows the receiver to move rearward into the stock.  This feels odd the first few times, but you get used to it fast. Compstock Internals What you’ll also get used to is the recoil reduction, in fact, you’ll learn to love it.  It works surprisingly well, and the non-tactical appearance is nice to see in a day and age where everything is tactical.  It’s great for high volume bird hunters, skeet shooters, and of course, it’s great for competitions like 3 Gun. High Volume like this… It greatly reduces the recoil of your average buckshot and slugs to the point it’s more like shooting an AK than a shotgun.  It makes birdshot almost like a 5.56 with a full-sized rifle. The Compstock is also cheap for what it is.  For people like me who struggle with a lasting shoulder injury, it’s one way we can still shoot high volume pain free.  It also allows smaller people to control and use a shotgun with comfort and authority. The biggest downside is getting used to the Compstock and then going back to a traditional stock and remembering what real recoil feels like. 5. Fab Defense Folding Stock Best Folding Shotgun Stock "Fab Defense Folding" Buttstock 180 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 180 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing If you really want to go big and don’t mind spending a little extra money Fab Defense makes a fantastic Mossberg 500 stock.  It’s designed to basically replicate a AR 15 style stock and is a thoroughly modern option. The stock is mounted on a five-position aluminum buffer that allows for immediate adjustment for size, clothing, or presence of body armor. The stock itself is simple and robust. It’s fitted with sling points for QD and webbed slings as well as a small storage compartment. The stock can also be folded out of the way, for easier storage and a more compact package overall. The stock also integrates a recoil reducing buffer that absorbs shock when the stock is extend. Admittedly it’s not as recoil reducing as the comp stock but it takes some bite out of the dog. The pistol grip is very AR like in design and angle.  You also get QD sling points right above the pistol grip to make carrying the gun with the stock folded possible. Fab Defense Folding Stock Installed What I really like about the Fab Defense stock is the options.  You can instantly go between compact power with the stock folded, to recoil reducing stability with it unfolded. The design is sleek, modern, and it’s a solid stock for a combat or home defense shotgun. Admittedly, it’s a pricey stock, one of the most expensive on the market. Is it worth it?  That’s the tough question to answer. If recoil -reducing is more your flavor…they also have one of those varieties! Maverick 88 with FAB Defense Stock Fits Maverick 88 and Mossberg 500/590 series shotguns.  Definitely have a less sore shoulder after installing this bad boy. FAB Defense Recoil Reducing Mossberg 500 Stock 250 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 250 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 6. Bonus – Ergo Grip Adapter Ergo Moss 500 Tact Stock Adaptor 30 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 30 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing I included this as a bonus because it is playing way too loose with the term stock. The Ergo grip adapter is a 4-ounce piece of glass filled polymer and a screw that has the ability to allow some extreme customization of your Mossberg 500. It’s cheap, easy and efficient. So, what it does is simple.  You attach the Ergo grip to your shotgun via the screw and you now have two points to add an AR grip, buffer tube, and stock. With the AR market, arguably being the biggest firearms aftermarket ever, you have tons of options to add stocks and pistol grips. BCM Grip and Magpul MOE Stock Personally, I prefer the BCM Gunfighter grips on my ARs, so why wouldn’t I want one on my shotgun? So, I did. Then I added a six-position tube and a Magpul MOE stock. I now had a shotgun that mimicked the furniture of my AR 15. My options for stocks and grips are nearly endless with the Ergo grip.  I could even add a side folding AR stock adapter like the LAW adapter and have a side folding AR 15 stock on my Mossberg 500. The Ergo grip adapter is there to allow you to choose the right stock and grip option for you.  With so many AR options out there you have an exceptional amount of choices. Is that all? This is a relatively short list in terms of Mossberg 500 stock options.  There are just so many of them out there we couldn’t possibly list them all.  Thankfully our readers tend to pretty smart (and handsome) people, with a lot of experience. We want to know: what stocks do you prefer?  Any disagreements with my list? Let me know why in the comments!

Sig P225

Sig P225

The Sig P225 is a pistol that was largely overlooked by North American gun buyers, but holds a place of respect in my heart. I have chosen this little single stack 9mm pistol for my personal CCW pistol for a few years now. I’ll be the first one to tell you I wasn’t in a traditional combat arms job during my nearly 10 year military career. I didn’t have a career of kicking doors and bringing hate and discontent to America’s enemies but that didn’t stop me from trying to shoot as often as I could and try to digest every bit of gun knowledge I could get my hands on. Anyone who has met me in person and talked about firearms with me can pick up on that fact easily. To start this article lets clear some things up right off the start. I want to say that this P225 is not the same as the recently rereleased Sig Sauer P225-A1 . My pistol is a pre unification German production and features the “Made in W. Germany” roll mark. This makes it a pre 1989 manufactured pistol, and that’s a good thing in my mind. Although it makes it different enough from it’s newer and similarly named cousin the Sig P225-A1 According to Sig Sauer head of pistol development nothing on my P225 is compatible with the current P225A1 including the magazines. When I pressed him for an explanation he refused to comment on it and said it was proprietary information, which to me was a weak response at best especially for the Head of Pistol Development. Anyway let’s get back to this pistol, my choice for conceal carry and why it’s one of my favorite pistols. I looked for this pistol for a few years and could only find the P6 version of it which was issued to German and Swiss military policemen and border guards primarily. The P6 and the P225 look almost identical except the roll mark and hammer. P6 hammers feature a noticeable loop where as the P225 features a solid hammer. Urban legend is that the P6 has a loop in the hammer so that armorers could tell if the weapon was dropped on its backside. The legend goes on to say that its to ensure proper hammer and sear mating. I have yet to find anyone who could prove that tale, that’s why I refer to it as urban legend. Why the P225 ? I get asked that a lot when I tell people what I use for a CCW weapon. To be honest I was a huge fan of Sig Sauer until my dealings with them at SHOT show and have owned more than a dozen different pistols manufactured by them. I also like single stack 9mm pistols, which the P225 is. I previously has used a P239 in .40 S&W until I realized I hated shooting that particular round. I wanted a pistol that was both thin and compact yet easy to handle during firing drills. I also wanted one slightly bigger than my previous CCW pistol, which seemed to exhibit a little more muzzle rise than I liked. I also wanted something with a proven record and the P225 in my mind fulfilled that requirement with its military service with several countries. Some people may knock the Sig P225 for only have an 8 round single stack magazine, but that doesn’t bother me. If you look at basic statistics about shootings you will see that the chances of getting into a running gun battle as seen on TV or movies like Heat is pretty slim. In my mind a pistol is used to break contact and extricate yourself from a situation or to be used in close quarters. Specifications of Sig P225 Length: 7.09″ Height: 6.37″ Weight: 1.81 Lbs Empty Barrel Length: 3.86″ Width across grips: 1.255 ” Magazine Capacity: 8 rounds My shooting experiences with the P225 have been fantastic as a whole. The double action trigger is long around 12 lbs and the single action is 5,25 lbs according to my lyman digital gauge. Longer trigger pulls tend to run a lot of people away from pistols like the P225. I have a slight understanding of the liability concerns that Sig Sauer has to deal with when manufacturing pistols, so long trigger pulls don’t bother me. In my three years of owning this pistol I can honestly say after several thousand rounds I have yet to experience any sort of failure to fire or failure to extract a spend casing. This pistol has eaten any sort of cheap ammunition I could find as well as premium defensive pistol ammo like the Hornady Critical Defense ® ammo and the Federal Hydra-Shok®. There are some downsides to the P225 that I briefly touched on. The smaller round capacity and the age of the pistol can create some issues with it comes to magazines. I have yet to find a third party magazine manufacturer like Mec Gar. Although Mec Gar does make magazines for other model of Sig Sauer pistols, just not this one. The weight of the pistol is another concern for some users, you have to remember this pistol was designed in the old days when most pistols were steel. Gaston Glock’s company was still trying to prove itself when this was designed and polymers had not been fully embraced by the gun industry yet. Personally I think a polymer P225 would be great. The Sig P225 isn’t perfect, and it isn’t for everyone’s conceal carry needs. Right now it is the choice I use but if I can’t find a quality kydex holster to replace the aging leather one I have, it might be time to look at other options and relegate this pistol to the gun cabinet. I don’t see myself ever getting rid of the P225, but it will be a range gun just like my Browning Hi Power and my Heckler & Koch P7M8. Thanks for checking out our new relaunch of the site. We intend to continue to bring you inside looks and evaluations of all the firearms we can get our hands on. If there is something specific you would like to know about or see reviewed, drop us a line in the comment section and let us know. Rick

What is the best handgun for women?

What is the best handgun for women? It’s a question I’ve heard asked too many times to count! Every day more and more women are becoming involved with defensive shooting and concealed carry. The reality today is that and concealed carry and defensive shooting is a male dominated world. The reality is men and women are different and sometimes the simple fact is lost. Clothing matters, body shape matters, physical size and strength matter, the difference between men and women is important. A man does not shoot like a woman nor does a woman shoot like a man, understanding the difference in your ability and attributes will give you the ability to efficiently shoot a handgun. Once you understand these differences, and learn your abilities and deficiencies, it will be possible to find which concealed carry handgun is best for you, regardless of your gender. Types of handguns So if we are to attempt to find the best pistols for women, three things must be taken into consideration: 1. Handgun type 2. Handgun caliber 3. Handgun physical size Handgun type There are two types of handguns that are available today, the revolver and the semi automatic. I tend to lean heavily towards the revolver for women for several reasons. The first reason is explained in our video about the dirty little secret of semi automatic handguns. Understanding that the majority of attacks on women take place in close physical proximity, belly to belly or belly to back, the drawback of a semi automatic handgun not firing when pressed into one’s attacker would be a fatal flaw. There are two primary areas to consider when trying finding the best handgun for a woman. Reliability and efficiency. Remember you carry a gun so that you have a tool to defend yourself or your loved ones should you need to. This means that you need a gun that works, every time. A gun that doesn’t function is no longer a gun, it becomes a very expensive club. Revolvers have an edge over semi automatics in the reliability category as they are far less prone to mechanical causes of not firing. Efficiency is where semi automatics have the edge. A semi automatic is more efficient than a revolver when it comes to reloading. There is no comparison in the time it takes to reload a semi automatic handgun compared to a revolver. Ammunition capacity is also an issue with the revolver the typical concealed carry revolver has a capacity of six rounds. Semi automatic handguns start with eight rounds and go upwards to as many as 20. The difference in trying to perform a reload maneuver, even when a speed loading devices used with a revolver the revolver reload is much slower and in my opinion requires more dexterity. In comparison, when changing a semi auto handgun magazine it can normally be done, with practice, without having to look at the handgun. In a major drawback I have personally seen with a semi automatic is the issue of a woman being able to cycle the slide. Assuming that a woman carries her semi automatic handgun with a round in the chamber this would not be an issue when under duress nor would it be an issue during a tactical reload situation. When you are running a gun in a life and death situation ease of reloading your handgun plays a huge role in your success or failure. When it comes to reloading the semi automatic handgun beats the revolver hands-down. There is much to be said about shot placement and the amount of rounds it takes to disable an assailant. The truth of the matter is, that during an assault, your body is performing off of the muscle memory training it received during your range and dry fire practice. There are studies that prove that during an assault your marksmanship will only be 50% as good as your best day on the range. That means if you shoot 50 perfect rounds at the range, only 25 will hit your target when under duress. That’s right, one out of every two shots! Handgun caliber I recommend the largest caliber round the woman can comfortably from fire and control. Whether it is a .38 or a .45 is largely inconsequential, as control of the handgun and shot placement is tantamount. Much has been said and written about large capacity semi automatic handgun magazines. The idea seems to have seeped into our minds that the best handgun is one that has a 20 round magazine. The truth of the matter is that the vast majority of shootings involve less than four rounds being fired before the perpetrator or victim is incapacitated. The massive capacity gun magazine hype was brought to the forefront by our media and their vast coverage of gang drive-by shootings. Think about it for a second, you’re walking along the sidewalk in suburbia USA, a car full of gangbangers pulls up and start spraying the house you are walking in front of with your child. Is your first thought going to be two unholster your handgun and fire back, or would it be to throw yourself on top of your child and take him to the ground to protect yourself and them. This speaks to having the right frame of mind and mindset to carry concealed. This is explained further in our article titled The Proper Mindset of Concealed Carry. Handgun physical size Caliber Size Is Where the Rubber Meets the Road. The Best Handgun for Women Can Be Determined When They Balance the Three Important Factors of Their Personal Handgun. These Three Factors Are Power, Recoil Management and Concealability. Caliber Has Already Been Discussed, Leaving Concealability As the Remaining Factor. Although a larger frame gun makes managing recoil much easier due to the weight and size, it makes the gun more difficult to conceal. Conversely a smaller concealable handgun may be noticeably more difficult to shoot as a result of increased felt recoil. My best advice is to find a brick and mortar gun store with a shooting range. Spend some time with the person behind the counter finding the best physical fit of a handgun. Handgun caliber can then be determined by renting each of the guns and testing them on the range. Pistols for women When faced with the data concerning assaults on women my recommendation is that the best handgun for women is a revolver. Understanding that most confrontation ends with less than four shots fired, the fatal flaw of a semi automatic handgun not firing when pressed against an attacker is insurmountable. If you are concerned about knockdown power, keep squeezing the trigger until the handgun does not fire any longer. Six rounds in the chest or side will stop even the most determined assailant. Handgun training for women As always, I highly recommend professional training at a range. There is much more to training than just the physical aspect of squeezing the trigger on your handgun. Having the proper mindset and spending the time under the right tutelage to settle the issue in your mind about whether or not you could possibly shoot another human being should be done in conjunction with your physical training. Trying to decide whether or not you could shoot someone else during an attack is not the right time to sort all of that out. Understanding what to do, and more importantly what to say after a shooting incident is one of the most important aspects of your training. Train yourself and be prepared for every step of the way from knowing when to unholster your firearm all the way through talking to officers and giving your statement. I hope this article was of some help, feel free to share your experiences, likes and dislikes of any firearms you may have experience with!

Archangel M1A Stock Review Tell All Buyers Guide

The M1A is a reliable and rugged rifle. But those who own it also know that it is bulky and requires multiple aftermarket upgrades to compete with the latest rifles. You need to upgrade the wooden stock to a synthetic, add a cheek riser, rails, and other additions to make your M1A perfect. Promag solved all the upgrade issues of the M1A in one package. The Archangel Stock is designed for the M1A by Archangel Manufacturing, a subsidiary of Promag. This stock kills not two, but ten, birds with one stone. Read further to know why is it such an exceptional and necessary upgrade for your M1A. IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Archangel M1A Most tactical and customizable stock for M1A on the market Lightweight, durable, and totally adjustable design for comfort Grip storage compartment and pre-installed studs and rails View Latest Price → Read Customer Reviews Main Features The Archangel M1A stock is made entirely from a high-grade polymer. It’s the reason why it is so light in weight. It is a synthetic stock which will get rid of your heavy wooden stock. No offense here, but the wooden stock is bulky and prone to damage and warping. Plus, if you have a vintage or custom wooden stock, you might not want to expose it to damage. Buy Now Another main feature of this stock is the inbuilt and adjustable cheek riser. Mounting and using the scope on an M1A is a challenging task. The design of the rifle makes it almost necessary to use a cheek riser and this stock definitely solves the problem. The stock is also extendable, which lets you shoot comfortably regardless of your position, clothing, or gear. It also has an angled pistol-style grip with a palm swell, which makes shooting more comfortable and helps with accuracy. Apart from that, the stock offers a lot of room for mounting accessories . The Picatinny rail on the forend is long enough to mount multiple accessories at once. This also makes the rifle bipod compatible. Additionally, the stock has a couple of swivel studs and multiple steel inserts for QD sling swivels, so you don’t have to drill or tap any holes for sling use. The mag well in the stock has good clearance and its front edge is also curved, to guide your movement as you push in a new magazine. Pro Mag Archangel M1A Stock Video Review Check Price! Pros Lightweight: The Archangel M1A stock weighs only 4.2lbs, which is approximately two pounds less than a wooden stock. This reduction in weight helps with handling the rifle, especially when you’re out hunting in the woods. Plus, it also reduces fatigue as you move or shoot with your rifle. Adjustable: The stock is adjustable for the length of pull and height of the cheek riser. Adjustments for both of these can be made easily using the thumbwheel which offers .05” per click adjustment. This not only helps with mounting and using a scope on your M1A, but you can also shoot comfortably in different positions. Extra Room for Accessories: The stock has multiple studs and inserts to let you mount slings. Plus, the rail on the forend lets you mount extra accessories. The stock comes with a forend cover, which covers the rail in case you are not using any accessories. Pistol Grip: The angled pistol grip in this stock is something rifle owners desire. It gives you a better grip on your rifle, which improves handling and accuracy. Plus, the grip also has storage space on the inside, which is definitely an advantage. Looks: This might not be an advantage to note, but the Archangel stock makes your rifle look ‘deadly’ and ‘cool’. Cons No Metal: This does not have an aluminum spine like competitors. This M1A stock is made only of polymer and doesn’t have any sort of aluminum or steel spine, which might make you doubt its durability. But this isn’t a very substantial issue unless you are planning on using your M1A for melee attacks. Might Require Fitting: This is not really a con, but a manufacturing issue. Some of these stocks might require a bit of thumping or filing to fit the action. But that’s just a few and not all stocks. What is the Archangel Stock Best For? Long Range Shooting: The Archangel stock makes your M1A adaptable to small and large optic scopes. Some scopes have a small objective and some have a large one, depending upon the range you are shooting at. The adjustable cheek riser and length of pull allow you to adjust your head appropriately so you don’t compromise on accuracy. This stock is also good for competition use because of its adjustability and weight. Practice: This stock is also good for bench shooting and target practice. As it lets you practice with different positions and different level of adjustment to find your best shooting stance. The forend rail can also be used to mount a bipod, which will allow you to shoot in a prone position as well. Hunting: This M1A stock packs a lot of features for hunting. The very first advantage is its weight. Hunting is a tedious task and you may have to walk miles in the woods to get a clear shot. This stock won’t let fatigue hamper your performance in such a situation. Plus, the extra sling mounting options and rails can be used to easily mount slings and other accessories, which will come in handy during your hunting trip. The pistol grip also has a small storage compartment, which can be used for carrying some extra stuff as well. Tactical: The Archangel stock also makes the M1A rifle good for tactical use. With this stock, coupled with your M1A action, you can use your rifle for self-defense. How to Install the Archangel Stock on Your M1A Installing the Archangel stock should not be a herculean task, but you must at least have a file on hand in case adjustments are necessary. You just have to drop your barreled action inside the stock for installation. However, there are still a few tips and tricks to be considered in order to attain the proper fit and to ensure the rifle works properly. Some of you might have the M1A match variants which have the rear lugged receivers. This stock is not compatible with them right out of the box, so you will have to make minor adjustments. Please refer to the video guide below, for proper guidance on installing this stock to your M1A action. Note: Check to see if your local state laws allow a pistol grip on a rifle (like in this stock). The manufacturer also offers a filler to seat on the grip. Watch the video below to know more about it. Bottom Line The Archangel M1A Rifle Stock is a complete package of all the important upgrades you need for your stock. It has an adjustable cheek riser, padded butt with a length of pull adjustment, a forend grip with cover, a pistol grip with storage space, and multiple inserts and studs for mounting swivels. The stock is lightweight and will reduce the weight of your wooden M1A by almost a couple of pounds. The adjustability, weight, and design of the stock make it appropriate to be used for almost every activity you use your M1A for. The installation of the stock might take some care, especially if your receiver is lugged. But once complete, this stock will be the best upgrade to your M1A rifle. Buy Now

Summary

/* custom css */. td_uid_2_5f379d581e222_rand. td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .